Today is April 26, 2017 approximately 1:35 p.m. And we are in San Diego, California. This is Vanessa Boulous. I'm here to interview Rich Collato on behalf on the YMCA Retirement Fund Legacy Project.

So, Rich, thank you very much to agree to share your story and some of your insights about your career. You had a wonderful, wonderful career, so I think it's great that we can capture some of those insights and share with others in the future.

So just going to start with the general question. What was your first YMCA experience?

Ms. Boulous

Mr. Collato

My first YMCA experience was with the Highland Park YMCA in Brooklyn, New York. It's called the Twelve Towns YMCA now. But let me tell you how I got to that Y experience. I was 12 years old. I was a kid growing up in Brooklyn in the inner city, East New York, just outside Bedford-Stuyvesant.

My dad was a street cleaner. My mom had never graduated high school. And my mom got polio when I was 12 years old and encephalitis, and she was put in an iron lung. And my dad was working two jobs. He was loading trash during the daytime, and then at night he was driving an ice cream truck.

And I started hanging around the streets and got involved with a group of other kids that all we did was get into trouble. And I remember we were on the Coney Island train, and we started unscrewing light bulbs and throwing them at the passengers.

And long story short, I got arrested. And I remember my dad and the judge made me an offer I couldn't refuse. They sentenced me to the YMCA. They basically said if I went to the YMCA the way my sister was going and not getting into trouble, I wouldn't have to go to juvenile hall.

So I tell everybody I was sentenced to the YMCA, and it turned out to be a life sentence. And you, Vanessa, as a Y professional, know that would be cruel and unusual punishment.


Ms. Boulous

So what was your sister doing at the YMCA?

Mr. Collato

My sister was the model YMCA kid. She was involved in everything from Day Camp to Hi-Y to Youth & Government. She had a part-time job there. So that was her home away from home.


Ms. Boulous

And at that point in time, do you recall why you maybe saw your sister going to the Y, but you didn't prior to your --

Mr. Collato

Well, I remember going to the Y once, but we just got into trouble. We were throwing Coke bottles at the windows. I was just in with a bad group of kids.


Ms. Boulous

Okay.

Mr. Collato

And was getting into trouble, and had no interest in channeling my energy in a positive direction.


Ms. Boulous

So do you recall that after -- now you're going to the Y because you had to through the judge's order. What were your acclimation, trying to now like the Y, because recognizing maybe that wasn't where your head was at the time?

Mr. Collato

Well, I remember my dad literally taking me by the back of the neck through the Y door, because I had no interest in being there. And I remember this guy, Bill Armet, I still remember his name, he was the physical education director, this guy with big shoulders and a small waist and muscles.

And he came over and he put his arm around me. And my dad let go of my neck and I went off with Bill. He was going to give me a tour. And I thought to myself, wow, this is really a nice guy. He's really concerned about me an obviously wanted to try and help me.

Well, Bill kind of took me under his wing and channeled my energy from the streets into sports. And he started bringing out leadership qualities that I didn't even know I had. I was exhibiting them in an anti-social and dysfunctional way, and he started channeling them to sports.

And one thing led to another. I was growing up in the YMCA. I was learning my values there. It became my home away from home. I loved it there. It was a great place. And I was learning new skills. I was teaching various physical education classes and swimming classes and coaching swimming eventually.

And then the YMCA helped me with part-time jobs so that I could go to college. And then I remember the physical education director left the Y. And after many years of growing up in the Y and working part-time in the Y, and the executive asked me if I would help hold the physical education department together while they found a new person. I said, "Of course. How could I not?"

My training and my background was in business administration. I had just gotten my degree from college. And I really was going to go into business or wanted to go into business. Well, I started working as the physical director, and they never even looked for another person. They never interviewed. And I was there three years as physical education director when I made a decision that if I was going to stay in the YMCA, I really should be in administration and was starting to think what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.


Okay. So if Bill were here today, what might you say to him? What might you tell him about yourself?

Ms. Boulous

Mr. Collato

I would tell Bill that you'll never know how much you affected my life in a positive way. But I would say, "Bill, there's thousands of other kids who you'll never know their name, and they probably can't remember your name, but you affected their lives, too."


Great. That's pretty amazing when you think back to the moment in time that you might have been a different person and didn't still like the Y.

Ms. Boulous

Mr. Collato

Well, I've --


Ms. Boulous

How your life could have been different.

Mr. Collato

Well, there's no question in my mind. If I hadn't found the YMCA or the YMCA hadn't found me, I would still be on the streets and probably getting into trouble, or I'd be in jail, or I wouldn't be alive.


Ms. Boulous

Yeah. Great story. So after working at that one Y for your three years, four years as the physical education, tell me what kind of you said now I'm really thinking long and hard I might need to do administration. Tell me a little bit about that next phase of your career.

Mr. Collato

I had two priorities and two goals. One is when you start thinking that you know more answers or better answers than your executive director, it's time to become an executive director. Of course, there could only be one leader at a Y at a time in the top management position.

And I had some ideas as to how to run a Y or how to run it differently. So I knew I wanted to be an executive director, and I knew I wanted to get as far away from Brooklyn as I could. Unfortunately, and I share this because there's a hidden message in it, I applied for an executive job at a YMCA in New York, and I never got an interview.

So I called up the HR department and I asked if I could come down. And I met with the HR director, and I said, "How come I didn't get an interview? I'm doing a good job here, and I'm getting nothing but good reviews." And she said, "Rich, everybody knows you're a great physical director. But nobody sees you as an executive director."

And I understood what she was saying, so I figured I either need to leave New York, because I'm not upwardly mobile there, and then started looking around for another position. And I knew I wanted to get as far away from Brooklyn as I could and kind of start my life over again and get away from the inner city.

The Y that I was working at was the Y that I grew up in and the Y that basically saved my life. One of my buddies, Peter Schlamp, went to the Berkeley Y, and I think he was associate executive there. And he called me and said, "We have a physical director position open here. Would you be interested? I'm pretty sure you could get it." So I said, "Well, I like the location, but I don't know anything about Berkeley or the West Coast, and I really would like to be in administration, not physical director." And he said, "Well, why don't you just come out? You'll get a free trip, we'll see each other."

He was a running buddy of mine. We went through CDP together, which was the Career Development Program, and became pretty close friends. At that time it was sensitivity training to some degree. And you really get to know a person.

So I didn't feel good about them paying for my way out there, because I didn't want to be physical director. But I saw another position listed in the bulletin, an executive position for Huntington Beach YMCA, the surf capitol of the world. And I called Peter and I said, "Hey, Peter, if you can get the Huntington Beach Y to give me an interview, and you split the cost, I'll interview at your Y and that Y." And he orchestrated that and arranged that. And I remember I went to Berkeley first, and I knew it wasn't for me. It was too much like Brooklyn.

And then they picked me up, the executive management team picked me up at the airport and took me to the -- drove me to the Huntington Beach Pier, where their surfing championships were. It was January. And there were people on the beach. It was just unbelievable. The sun was shining, people were surfing, there were all these people just enjoying themselves. And I thought to myself, walking out on the pier with them, I hadn't been there 15 minutes, I said I'm taking this job. I don't know if they're going to pay me or I'm going to pay them, but this is where I want to live.


So it really was sounding like just truly quality of life in addition to the career aspirations?

Ms. Boulous

Mr. Collato

Yes.


Ms. Boulous

And I liked the way you had mentioned restarting over or starting fresh and all that kind of thing.

Mr. Collato

Mm-hmm.


Ms. Boulous

So just so people appreciate the breadth of your career, how many years did you work for the Y? And just state the very first job, which I know you've already mentioned, and the very last job.

Mr. Collato

I was director of health and physical education for the YMCA of Greater New York, the Highland Park branch, which is now Twelve Towns. And I started there in 1967. And I retired in 2010 from the YMCA of San Diego County, which was and is the second-largest YMCA in the United States. And I retired there in 2010 as the CEO, president and CEO.


Ms. Boulous

Amazing career. That's so easy to state, and there are so many things between that first job, first impression to your last day at the San Diego Y, so lots of opportunities to bring out some great memories and some insights from you. So that's why I'm glad we're doing this interview.

Shifting a little bit about a mentor to you, whether it was in the Y or even outside the Y, that really helped you in your position and maybe how they influenced you.

Mr. Collato

In the YMCA, the mentor, who I was blessed with who really helped me in my growth and development was John Danielson. And he was on the Y-USA staff as the operations person. And I remember when I became CEO of the YMCA San Diego County, John really took me under his wing. And I got there in January. My wife was pregnant with our first daughter, who was due in a few months. And John said, "I'm going to have the urban group meet in San Diego so that you could get to know everybody."

And he said, "And part of that is we usually have the hosting executive host a dinner at their house." So I said, "Okay, we're in." And I think what he was trying to do was not only introduce me to the group, but get me to feel comfortable and begin to build relationships.

And then every step of the way, John was very, very helpful to me in advising and counseling, because I had trained for the position, but there were a lot of things I didn't know and I had to learn.


Think about some of the times, conversations with John, meaningful to really getting your eyes to open up to what he was trying to do. The tacticalness obviously, having dinner at your house was pretty cool. I wish they still probably did that for some of the CEO groups.

But some other things when you really think about his influence on you, whether it was one conversation, a moment in time, an event that you guys were together. Anything you can think of?

Ms. Boulous

Mr. Collato

Yeah, many things. John taught me that relationships are important, not only relationships to be successful in building and growing the Y, but building relationships to attract and retain the best and the brightest staff, as well as for fundraising.

I remember John told me that always be sure that you don't spend more money than you take in. That's a novel approach in these days, but it was pretty fundamental and basic. And I took it to heart. He taught me the importance of saving for a rainy day and having some reserves.

And he was just always there when I needed him. And I'm still in touch with him. Now he needs me more, and we're in touch, and I support him in his retirement as well.


Ms. Boulous

So similar to the last person, if you could say something to John about just that, like what would you say if he was sitting here?

Mr. Collato

I value your friendship more than you can imagine.


Ms. Boulous

Great. Awesome. So next question, what do you believe was the most significant thing that happened in the Y Movement during your career? So think about obviously the span of the 40 years, obviously societal events, the Y Movement responding to those or just, boy, I remember that was just so amazing that the Y Movement accomplished that or responded to something.

What do you think was one of the most significant? Probably there's more than one, but if you can think of one or two.

Mr. Collato

Well, one of the most significant things in the Y Movement that I remember was when we identified that a large majority of our population was not using the YMCA. And that was the Hispanic, Latino population. And I was on a task force that was brainstorming what we could do. And as an outcome of that task force, we developed a national YMCA Hispanic Latino task force to try and initiate strategies nationally to attract and retain more Hispanics in the Y.

And it was real interesting. The learning was we tried for two and a half years to develop Hispanic programs, only before realizing and being told the Hispanics don't want Hispanic programs. They want Y programs. But they want to be comfortable going there. And we realized that we needed Hispanic staff before we could have more kids and families coming to the Y.

And that was the beginning. I did that for many years, gave leadership to that task force, but that was the beginning, I think, of reaching a whole new population in the YMCA.


Ms. Boulous

Okay, great. Think, too, about any other -- I know we've mentioned the childcare, for example -- external in the Y Movement, too, something to the outside world that the Y Movement was a part of that change maybe. I think that was a good one you did mention about there wasn't even childcare when you started in the Y and that enormous impact the Y Movement has on the people that we've served.

Anything else that comes to mind?

Mr. Collato

Well, now one of the largest programs in the YMCA is before and after school childcare. And when I first started in the YMCA, that wasn't even something that was identified. There weren't as many working women at that time, or dual-working families, so perhaps it wasn't as great a need.

But I remember when I left New York, went to Huntington Beach, and then from there went to Los Angeles, I remember when I was in Los Angeles, the Y that I was executive of, we started a program for the little kids, before school and after school.

And we didn't have very many of them, and we never thought of it as childcare, but we gave birth in our own way to childcare at that YMCA. And who would have ever dreamed that grew into the kind of program that it is? When I left the San Diego YMCA Association, we had 10,000 kids a day, 10,000 kids a day in before and after school childcare.


Ms. Boulous

So what's your impression then of what that evolution of that program then helped with shaping some of America's society, how we were able to respond? I mean, it's pretty powerful.

But what would you think about if someone said, "Well, what have you witnessed over that program, might where we be in this country?"

Mr. Collato

Well, you would have a bunch of little Riches running around the streets with keys around their neck and nobody home to greet them and not eating healthy and not hanging around the streets and not getting any supervised care and not learning new skills and not making memories that would last a lifetime.

Childcare brought more than just babysitting. We were raising kids basically.


Ms. Boulous

I often think, how could businesses survive without the people working? So you served so more than just the kids and the parents. You served the community and the businesses.

Mr. Collato

Yeah, and it revolutionized parenting, in a way, because it made it okay to have dual-working families, whereas before, when I was a kid, it was unheard of. And it made it okay to have dual-working families, which not only enriched the lives of the parents, but also enabled more people to enter the workforce and make significant contributions to society.


Ms. Boulous

That's a great way to put it. That was great. Love it. What do you think you're most proud of when you reflect on your career?

Mr. Collato

In each one of my Y positions, there's a little nugget that I'm most proud of. But starting with the YMCA of San Diego County that I spent quite a few years at, when I got there, it was about $5 million annual operating budget. It had almost as much money in debt.

And it was really a troubled Y. And it was struggling. And my job basically when I went there was to take it into chapter 11 bankruptcy and try and work it out, or work with the creditors out of bankruptcy and try and keep the Y whole, which is what I did.

And fast-forwarding, we basically built a team, turned the YMCA around, paid all the debt that we owed and then built over $100 million in improved facilities and new facilities through capital campaigns without any borrowing. And when I left the Y, I left it debt-free.


Ms. Boulous

So think So think about the days that you're trying to figure that strategy out. Truly it's the vision, the implementation, but what were you thinking sometimes when you'd leave and go home after a hard day of trying to get people on the same page?

Obviously it took patience and perseverance to even pay the debt back and then to ever think it would be 50 times or whatever that math is to get it. I mean, what were some of those days like? Do you remember some of those?about the days that you're trying to figure that strategy out. Truly it's the vision, the implementation, but what were you thinking sometimes when you'd leave and go home after a hard day of trying to get people on the same page?

Mr. Collato

Oh, I remember them well, because at the first meeting with the board, I disclosed to them the extent of the problem. They didn't know there was a drawer full of checks that were cut and booked, but never sent out.

And they really didn't have their arms around the finances. So when I disclosed it, about a third of the board never came back to the next meeting. And that helped me do my job actually. And then they basically -- the board and the board chairman basically told me, "We don't want you to sell your house in Huntington Beach, because we're not sure if the Y will make it. And we don't want you to be stranded."

So they gave me an extra living allowance for six months to rent an apartment. And my wife stayed in Huntington Beach, and I lived by myself while I was trying to figure this out.

And I remember at night, I had a little apartment. I had a TV and a beach chair basically and a telephone. And I'd call my wife, and she would tell you that the conversations were the same every night. "I don't think this problem is solvable. I don't think this problem is solvable." And the breakthrough was after a month or two, she said I changed what I was saying. I started saying, "I don't think this problem is solvable in my lifetime", which means it was solvable.

And then I started thinking about how the problem might be solved. And another mentor that I had, who was a benefactor of mine in Los Angeles, Gilbert Van Camp, Jr. of Van Camp Seafoods, who became a very close friend, I remember going back to LA to talk to him, because I couldn't meet payroll. And he said, "Oh, that's no problem. I'll send you the money to meet the payroll." And he said, "How much do you need?"

And I said, "Gil, this isn't your problem. This is San Diego's problem. You help Los Angeles. It's not right to take your money and solve their problem." And he said, "Well, what could I do to help you?" And I said, "Maybe you could come down to San Diego and talk with some of the bigger donors and let's get them to help solve the problem."

And he drove down with me from Los Angeles, and we met with three of the largest potential donors. And in one day, we walked away with $170,000 to pay back bills, back bills.

And Mr. Van Camp would just say, "Hey, I'm not even from around here, but I'll take one-fourth of it if you'll take one-fourth and give this guy a fighting chance." So the thing I'm most proud of was being able to empower the San Diego YMCA and turn it around.

And my learning from that is there's a lot of YMCAs that have financial deficits. And they're struggling to figure out the finances. What they need to realize, the finances are not the problem. It's a symptom of the problem. Y after Y that's having financial problems really has what I call a leadership deficit.

The leadership deficit turns into a program deficit and mission deficit, and that results in a financial deficit, but because nobody comes to the Y and wants to contribute.So one would ask themselves, what do you need to do to solve the leadership problem? Well, if you bring in a new CEO, that's the first thing. But eagles fly with eagles. Turkeys flock, but eagles fly with eagles.

And I decided I needed to bring eagles in there and surround myself with eagles. And had to turn over nine of 11 executive staff people the first year, and then started bringing in what I call the top guns of the YMCA, the best and the brightest, and keep recruiting them. And it's amazing how it works. Good staff recruit good staff. Good staff recruit good board members. And it just begins to perpetuate itself.


Ms. Boulous

So think about the years you were there. Now you're past the debt and you're paid back, you're on the fly wheel, you've got great staff coming to work for you. I don't know how many years that took, 10 or however long it took. Was there a day that you can remember sitting at your desk or driving over to a branch and kind of looking back and say, "I think this is good. This is definitely going to be much bigger than I ever imagined"?

Were there moments in time or just events that happened that you started to really know that this isn't just giving us end of stable and to become a good Y. Obviously you grew it to be an amazing Y. Do you ever remember sort of pausing and looking at maybe a new facility or program or dinner you were at and said I know this is, when I probably end up here, this is going to be something bigger than I've ever imagined?

Mr. Collato

Well, I knew that the community needed a YMCA. And I knew that it was my responsibility and duty to do whatever needed to be done to assure the San Diego community had a strong and vibrant YMCA. So I began to build my own confidence and I began a strategic planning process and began trying to put the right players in the right spot in order to enable me to empower them to make miracles happen.

And I developed a management philosophy that worked for me, and it was a decentralized philosophy. Rather than I'm not really that smart and don't have that much skill or talent, except recruiting good people and building good relationships with donors, but I knew that if I could surround myself with good people, empower them and help them get the resources to really make miracles happen in the lives of families and kids, that that YMCA would grow and grow and grow. And that's basically what we did.


Ms. Boulous

So, Rich, another question would be thinking back in terms of the Y as a movement, what do you think was one of the most significant things that happened during your career with the Y in terms of the Y movement and the bigger picture?

Mr. Collato

Well, there's no question about it. One of the most significant things that happened in the YMCA Movement during my career, it was in the early 1960s. And a decision was made to open the YMCA at specific times to women and girls, women and girls.

And I think the movement must have been getting inquiries, because the YWCA was not a strong movement at the time. And the YMCA was doing quite well. So I remember we allowed women in the Y to use the Y on Wednesdays. That became women's day.

And as you would guess, once we allowed that, then one day wasn't enough, because they were really benefiting from the Y, just like anybody who would go, and they wanted to come more frequently. And it went to two days and then eventually the Y decided that this is a family organization, and everything became co-ed.

And it's probably one of the best things that happened to the YMCA Movement. And it's certainly one of the more significant things that happened in society, because, in my mind, it was a beginning of giving women equal rights, equal rights to access and opportunity there at the YMCA. And you see the way it's evolved. Now some of our best YMCA leaders both volunteer and executives, are women.


Ms. Boulous

So try to think of not so much even the career and all the effort you put, but what does the Y really mean to you? I know your original story is how it helped shape your life. But if you could think of it in a way of just, what does the YMCA really mean to you?

Mr. Collato

There's no other organization in the world that has greater potential for affecting the lives of young people and families in a positive way than the YMCA. They come to the YMCA in the thousands, because they want to come and be there, not because they have to. What an opportunity we have to provide programs and experiences for them that enrich their lives. I mean, we're doing God's work through the YMCA.


Ms. Boulous

If you could give advice to a young, new Y professional, who probably doesn't even know what their potential is yet, that they could be you back in the day and then you when you ended your career. What kind of advice might you give them in terms of how to navigate through the work they're going to do?

Mr. Collato

Well, I would just first share with them, if you like your job or you love your job, then you stick with it. And if you're not enjoying, when work becomes work, that's the time to leave. I also would tell them that if you find a job you love, you'll never work a day in your life. And most of my staff would tell you I never worked a day in my life, because I loved what I was doing.Well, I would just first share with them, if you like your job or you love your job, then you stick with it. And if you're not enjoying, when work becomes work, that's the time to leave.

I also would tell them that if you find a job you love, you'll never work a day in your life. And most of my staff would tell you I never worked a day in my life, because I loved what I was doing.


Ms. Boulous

Great. So on behalf of the Y Retirement Fund, you did many, many years of service as a board member, so we appreciate that, and on behalf of all the people that have had Y careers. So I wanted at least get a chance to ask you a couple of questions about your service to the Y Retirement Fund and just some insights there.

So when you were actually becoming more obviously a long-term Y professional, you learned about this benefit called the Retirement Fund. What were some of your sort of initial reaction to, hey, Rich, by the way, with your package also comes this benefit? What did you think about the retirement benefit and the Retirement Fund when you first kind of were getting into your career?

Mr. Collato

I couldn't care less about it, as honest as I could be. I was a young person. I think my first job paid me $5,000 a year. And the last thing I ever thought about was retirement, because I was immortal. I was going to live forever. I wouldn't have to worry about that.

It wasn't till later years that I learned that my first Y executive for the first year and a half never paid in to my retirement fund. So he probably didn't value it too much, either, or he really needed the money for that YMCA.

I'm trying to think when I really understood or started valuing the Retirement Fund. It probably wasn't until the position before my position in San Diego, when I started realizing that I'm getting a little balance in there, and it's important. And I started putting in as much extra money as I could, which was a really smart thing to do at the time, and always encourage the young Y professionals to do the same.

In fact, just today one associate executive came over to me and said, "You won't remember this, but you told me to put as much money in the Retirement Fund as I could, and I've been doing that." So I said, "Well, you're going to have trouble spending it all when you retire", tongue in cheek.


Ms. Boulous

Right.

Mr. Collato

But he had a big grin on his face. So I started understanding the Retirement Fund. It was complex, all these different alternatives and choices. We've simplified it since and made it easier to understand.My dad always talked about his pension. And as a street cleaner, he was able to retire after 20 years in New York City at half pay. And he always talked about the importance of a pension program.

And I remember that. And then when I was asked to come on the Retirement Fund board in 1999, I thought to myself, there's no better place that I could spend my time than trying to oversee, I had 4,500 employees and we were in the Fund.

And almost all of the Y employees, probably most of their net worth is in the Fund. Unless they have a house, then they would have some net worth there. But Y employees don't have enough discretionary money for the most part to be able to invest and do some of the other things. We don't have 401(k) plans, we don't have stock options, we don't have those things.

So I began to realize just how important the Fund was and thought there was no better use of my time than doing that. And I served from 1999 to 2010. When I left active service and became a retiree, then I had to retire from the board.


Ms. Boulous

So just reflecting on your service at the Retirement Fund board, and you went through some of the sort of crazy times and the dotcom bust and ups and downs with the markets, and the Fund was growing.

And as a board member, what would be one of your fonder memories of your time serving as a board member, whether sort of meetings or just an experience that you might have had or outcomes?

Mr. Collato

Well, the thing that I enjoy most about serving on the board are the people. I enjoy the fellowship of the board members. And I've become close with the management staff. I consider each of them good friends, and I would look forward to seeing them on a quarterly basis.

 So it was the relationships. And I was also able to apply a lot of my business learnings from business school and my undergraduate, and I had a level of understanding. But I also grew as an individual and as a person and learned a lot.

I probably took away more from learnings from the Fund than I contributed, really.Well, the thing that I enjoy most about serving on the board are the people. I enjoy the fellowship of the board members. And I've become close with the management staff. I consider each of them good friends, and I would look forward to seeing them on a quarterly basis.

So it was the relationships. And I was also able to apply a lot of my business learnings from business school and my undergraduate, and I had a level of understanding. But I also grew as an individual and as a person and learned a lot. I probably took away more from learnings from the Fund than I contributed, really.


Ms. Boulous

Well, again, thank you for your service both there and obviously the Y. Is there anything else that you want share? Any other thoughts on just reflecting back on your career, the legacy that you've left with all the different Y experiences, the people you've touched? Anything, final closing comments?

Mr. Collato

I would say that nobody does it on their own. And I got to where I was or got to by standing on the shoulders of other people who supported me and helped me and made sure I didn't fall or fall down. And I think now each of us, especially me, the thing I can do the most and the best is give back to other people through coaching, mentoring and supporting the Y. I don't think there's any better organization than the YMCA for affecting the lives of people. And that's what it's all about. And I just close by saying God bless the YMCA.


Ms. Boulous

Well, that was excellent and just also for the record to thank your wife for all of her support for you. And I know how hard it is. And she's a wonderful lady as well and your family.

Mr. Collato

Thank you.